ISRO’s PSLV-C40 places Cartosat-2 Series, 30 other satellites in two different orbits

The Indian Space Research Organizstion (ISRO) successfully completed its 100th satellite launch.

After over four months, the Indian Space Research Organisation(ISRO) is back in the game as its powerboat Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C40) successfully placed 31 satellites in two different orbits in one of the longest missions.
The launch was also significant for another reason — ISRO demonstrated multiple-burn technology that it tested in three previous launches.

This was PSLV’s 42nd flight, and ISRO’s 100th satellite launch. The PSLV-C40 successfully placed the Cartosat-2 series satellite in a sun synchronous orbit.

Friday’s successful launch comes about four months after ISRO’s PSLV-C39 failed following a technical snag involving its heat shield. Prime Minister Narendra Modi congratulated ISRO scientists for the successful launch, saying the moment signified the country’s “bright future” in its space programme.

PSLV-C40 lifted off at 9.28am and soared into a cloudy sky. After a perfect flight sequence, each of which was applauded by Isro scientists, the four-stage rocket first injected the Cartosat-2 series satellite for earth observation into a 505-km polar sun synchronous orbit about 17 minutes after lift-off. Then, India’s nano satellite and 28 payloads from six countries, including the US and the UK, weighing 613kg were released into orbit one by one in a space of about seven minutes.

In a multi-orbit manoeuvre, the micro satellite built by ISRO was placed in orbit after PSLV-C40 was brought down to 359.5km in a polar sun synchronous orbit. The fourth stage was finally shut off at 2 hours 21 minutes, thus making the mission the longest ever by ISRO.

With PSLV, ISRO indeed is giving a tough competition to other players in the game, like SpaceX and Boeing. Who will win the game? Only time will tell!